Richard A. Lindsey, CPA

Lindsey & Waldo, LLC – Certified Public Accountants

  • Jul 7

    How to Write Off Katie’s Soccer Camp

    Yes, it is quite do-able. But, like many things in the tax code, the devil is in the details. Let’s see if I can cut through the Tax Mumbo Jumbo for you.

    If Katie (or Bruce) is younger than 13 and goes to a DAY camp (overnight doesn’t work), and you are both working (or “looking for work”) then,…

    Cha-ching.

    You can then choose to pay for the camp using a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) or you can take the child care credit. Remember credits are better than deductions. With both the FSA and the child care credit, other eligible expenses include the cost of day care or preschool, before or after school care, and a nanny or other babysitter while you work.

    The size of the credit depends on your income and the number of children you have who are younger than 13. You can count up to $3,000 in child care expenses for one child, or up to $6,000 for two or more children.

    There are some limitations. The credit is only good for families of a certain income range and the percentage of eligible costs varies with income.

    All told, it’s a good deal which you should take advantage of, if you qualify.

    Bonus… If you have two or more children and child care costs exceed $5,000 for the year, you can benefit from both accounts. You can set aside up to $5,000 in pretax money in your FSA for child care costs, then claim the child care credit for up to $1,000 in additional expenses.

     

    Other strange, but true deductions

    You can pay your significant other (pay attention now) to do legitimate work for you and take a deduction.

    Bruce hired his live-in girlfriend to manage his rental properties. Her duties included finding furniture, overseeing repairs, and running his personal household. He went to Tax Court and fought the IRS which had disallowed the entire deduction. He won a deduction for the portion of his payments which could legitimately be tied to her business work.

    A married couple owned a junk yard and put out cat food to attract wild cats. Why, you might ask? The feral cats they were trying to attract dealt with snakes and rats on the property. That made for a safer junkyard for customers.

    And that made cat food a business deduction. The IRS first thought this was ridiculous, but before the case reached the Tax Court the IRS agreed!

    The details are always important, so be careful and ask us for advice first.