Richard A. Lindsey, CPA Lindsey & Waldo, LLC – Certified Public Accountants
  • Seven Traits of a Champion

    Sep 1

    What is a champion? By definition, it’s someone who excels above all others. Generally, it refers to a world class athlete, but it could just as easily apply to a top businessperson. Nancy Holland Morgan, a two time Olympic skier, has identified seven traits that can help us understand how we too can get to the top of our game and become champions.

    You have to really like what you are doing. If you don’t have a love of the activity, an enthusiasm that turns into a burning, white-hot desire, then it may be time to sit down and reassess your life’s interest. Without it, you will not have the passion necessary to sustain the drive. Without passion, none of the other traits will even matter.

    Achieving success invariably means having to learn new techniques, master new skills, develop new strengths, or obtain new knowledge. But more often than not, as we learn new skills and techniques, we don’t get it right the first time. We have to practice. Repetition, practice, review, effort, feedback, all go into learning the fundamentals. Commitment to learning is an absolute necessity for improvement in any activity.

    Combine your desire with commitment to training, and you begin to formulate a thoughtful plan to improve your performance. But, all the desire and commitment in the world won’t do you any good unless you have a goal. Champions set goals based on their strengths and weaknesses. Their plans revolve around reaching new thresholds based on increasing their strengths and overcoming their weaknesses. Champions know that to compete seriously for their personal best, they must surrender themselves to the goal.

    The first three traits prepare us for the fourth: tenacity. Life is a series of tests; we have to pass each one to go on to the next. As we move higher up the mastery scale, we take the chance of falling harder and longer. The falls are always painful. But, we must learn to get up after each fall and continue onward.

    No one today makes it to the top alone. All champions surround themselves with a support team. The strength of others is crucial to achieving the goal of championship status. Your support team may be only your closest family members, it may be a friendship circle, or it may consist of a paid staff of advisors. Your team’s job is to keep you in the right attitude as you gain altitude.

    Do something every day that scares you just a little — not something life threatening, but something that causes you enough discomfort that you will become accustomed to pushing the envelope of your performance. Get to love your zone of discomfort. It means that we are in an awkward phase of learning a new skill or strategy to help us achieve a higher level of performance. Some people seem to move in and out of the discomfort zone more easily. This is generally either because they have more experience living in the zone of discomfort or they have learned to fake it better than others!

    People like to be around those who have an aura of self-confidence and positive self-esteem. Self-confidence means you believe in the potential of achieving your goals. High self-esteem means you are satisfied with your talents and are able to recognize and appreciate the talents of others. This is not about being arrogant, but rather a more humble expression that you are comfortable with yourself, your accomplishments, and your talents.

    Being a champion starts and ends from within. To achieve success, you must start with a strong desire and end with the courage to maintain positive self-esteem and confidence in your ability. But in between is where the real work takes place. Championship status takes every bit of inner strength and external leveraging you can muster. With hard work, the rewards will be those of a champion.

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