Richard A. Lindsey, CPA

Lindsey & Waldo, LLC – Certified Public Accountants

  • Mar 3

    Current research suggests that we are bombarded with between 300 and 700 marketing messages per day. Current research also indicates that we take note of less than half of those messages, and far fewer make a strong enough impact to be recalled, make an impression, or make a sale.

    Here’s a tried and true strategy for connecting with your customers and prospects. Legendary copywriter, Robert Collier, pioneered and perfected an effective strategy he called “entering the conversation already occurring in the prospect’s mind.” Instead of going straight into your pitch marketing message and being ignored like everyone else, do something different. After all, if you do what everyone else does, shouldn’t you expect the same mediocre results?

    Instead of hitting your prospects over the head with your message, first capture your prospects attention by using something they are already thinking about as the hook. Then, make a smooth transition into the marketing message. This strategy has been proven to work over and over again. There are several ways to implement this strategy. One is by using holidays.

    Holidays are always on people’s minds. For instance, right now people are thinking about what they are going to do for the upcoming holidays. Where are we going for Christmas or Hanukkah? Where’s the New Year’s Eve party? Am I going to make (and keep) any New Year’s resolutions? Where should I take my sweetheart for Valentine’s Day? Where’s the best place to go for some corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day?

    And on and on. Those are just the major holidays in the next four months. There’s a major holiday almost every month. There are also obscure holidays you probably never heard of nearly every day of the year. You did know that December 25th is also National Pumpkin Pie Day, didn’t you? So, why not make a connection with your prospect by “entering the conversation already occurring in the prospect’s mind” by relating your message to the approaching holiday?

    You have to make a reasonable connection between the holiday and your offer. Otherwise, the prospect will feel like you tried to trick them and that’s no way to get them to know, like, and trust you, let alone buy something from you. It’s really not that hard. You can probably come up with several ideas if you just sit down and think about it.

    New Year’s Day is easy. Think about tying your message to something new or to a New Year’s resolution. Health clubs and gyms do it every January. The air waves and ads talk about the most common New Year’s resolution around – losing weight. With the promise that this year — you can do it… you can have that new body, the new you — with our help.

    And, of course, you can have a “sweetheart” deal for Valentine’s Day.

    This is a powerful, tried and true marketing strategy. And the best part is… if it works this year, you can recycle it again next year!

  • Feb 17

    New January 31 Deadline for Employers

    Employers are now required to file their copies of Form W-2, submitted to the Social Security Administration by January 31.

    The new deadline also applies to Forms 1099-MISC reporting non-employee compensation, such as payments to independent contractors.

    In the past, employers typically had until the end of February if filing on paper, or the end of March if filing electronically, to submit copies of these forms.

    The new accelerated deadline will make it easier for the IRS to spot errors and verify the legitimacy of tax returns and properly issue refunds to eligible taxpayers. Penalties for late filing can be exorbitant! For example, if a business fails to file Form 1099-MISC or furnish a copy to the payee on time the penalty can be as high as $520 per occurrence.

    New March 15 Deadline for Partnerships and LLCs

    Partnership tax returns are now due March 15, NOT April 15 as in the past.

    S corporation tax returns due date remains unchanged at March 15.

    New April 15 Deadline for C Corporations

    C corporation tax returns are now due April 15, NOT March 15.

  • Feb 3

    How The Tax Code Makes Regular Taxpayers Angry

    Many people think that preparing taxes for a living is a somewhat easy assignment.

    Bless their hearts.

    It’s NOT just “filling in the boxes” and having the spreadsheets or the software spit out the results. I WISH it were so simple. There are three big reasons why it’s much harder than that — even for many professionals.

    1) The tax code is incredibly long. The version of the tax code we are using right now is more than 75,000 pages long (and that is about 186 times LONGER than it was back in 1913 when we started with it) — and it will likely be getting longer this coming year.

    2) The code also happens to be pretty complicated and laden with contradictory incentives. Take this credit, and watch that other credit go bye-bye. Fail to deduct this item, and then you won’t be able to deduct that other item. You get the picture.

    Sorting through all of them is most definitely NOT a task for a computer software program. It requires sitting down with an individual, a business owner, a family, determining what they most care about, and then use that complicated code to plan for it all properly. Really, that’s the only way to do it. Everything else is just “after the fact” clean-up work.

    Which is why it’s so critical to meet with someone before the end of the year to make sure that you’re set up to hold a tax position which represents the real picture of where you really want to be going.

    This is the essence of tax planning. Some may say that this is overstating it — but, after years of doing this, I’ve become convinced that it’s the truth. I’m in the business of helping you fulfill your dreams by helping you hold on to as much income/revenue as possible!

    3) Oh, and as I alluded to previously, there is one more big reason this job is no cupcake — staying up to date with how the law is constantly changing.

    And I’m as patriotic as the next person … but, Congress makes THIS task no cupcake.

    Despite what certain fringe voices might claim (and they cite all kinds of “facts” behind their claims), the truth is that we don’t have the choice to “not file” or “not pay” what the tax laws say we owe. That’s why the IRS audits returns and has all sorts of “encouragements” (liens, refund offsets) to encourage us to file by each April 15, and to do so correctly.

    But, even with automatic payroll deductions, etc. we U.S. taxpayers are trusted to fill out the forms, ensure the correct amount was withheld and let the IRS know what our true final bill was. That’s called tax filing. And if we discover that we owe the U.S. Treasury, then our system (as it stands now) relies on us to send in the necessary payments. This, of course, is what we spend much of our time on around here at Team Lindsey — helping YOU do this ethically, but ensuring you’re not overpaying.

    But, Congress makes this much harder than they need to.

    They do this — probably unintentionally — by tinkering with our tax laws so much. They change them, sometimes slightly, sometimes quite a bit, and they do so constantly. What’s worse is the annual rite of procrastination in the House and Senate. I see this all the time. As a regular course of business.

    And these delays in tax changes — or the decision to make some laws retroactive months later (extenders, estate tax, etc.) — totally screw up basic tax planning, sometimes negating options that could have been used to legally lower a tax bill.

    (Which, incidentally, is why I have to pay so much attention to what’s happening in the legislation NOW, during the offseason. I do this so you don’t have to.)

    So some people fudge their returns. And, unfortunately, they feel justified in doing so.

    One recent example was the first-time homebuyer credit that was created a few years back … then revised … and revised again. Many homebuyers had to “pay back” a credit that was taken under existing law — then later canceled.

    And I know (from conversations with real people) how many felt justified in finding ways to “skim back” (i.e. fudge) that $500 back into their returns because they were annoyed at how Congress handled it.

    And there are plenty of other tax laws with similar histories that tick off filers enough so that they look for ways of getting payback when they fill out their 1040s.

    Now, I’m not condoning these taxpayers’ decisions to “even up” the tax code where they may find it unfair. Life can be unfair and taxes are a part of that often unfair life.

    But, Congress can do a lot to prevent these “they hurt me, so I’ll hurt the tax system right back” attitudes, by doing its tax-writing job in a more rational and professional manner.

    Until it does, well, then, Capitol Hill is going to keep creating bad attitudes.

    But, here’s where some hope comes in…

    For my clients and contacts, you can rest assured that we are paying attention … and that we will be on top of even these woefully-procrastinating legislators. We’ll do all that is ethically possible to make sure you don’t make moves that you’ll regret after the fact.

    And the best way to help us help YOU, is by giving us a call to talk things through NOW, while we can still make a difference with 2016 returns.

    “You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn’t exist anywhere except in the mind.” – Dale Carnegie

  • Jan 20

    In the book Masters of Networking, Don Morgan asserts that there are three ways to increase the power of your network and improve its ability to help you achieve goals. Fortunately, he says, anyone can create this leverage by understanding three fundamental characteristics of human nature. However, he goes on, only those dedicated to becoming master networkers will commit to mastering the arts of friendship, generosity, and character. The person who creates this trilogy of leverage will be on the road to unlocking the full power of networks.

    Friends like to help friends. And at some point in your life, you’ve probably helped a good friend do something that you might not have enjoyed doing— painting a room, helping out with the move–just because he was your friend. You really couldn’t avoid it. If you make good friends of your networking associates, you gain the same kind of leverage.

    How do you turn networking associates into good friends? There’s nothing complicated or mysterious about it, Morgan says. Think back how you and your best friend became friends. You went places together, did things together, talked about things, and one day you realize that you have been best friends for some time without even realizing it.

    That’s what you do with your networking partners. Go places with them, do things with them, help them when they need help. Soon you’ll discover that associates have become good friends. Not all of them, of course, but the more effort you put into it, the more friends you’ll make. And the more powerful your network will be in helping you achieve goals.

    You’re at a party. You’re given several presents. You don’t have anything to give in return. How do you feel? A little less than wonderful, right? It’s human nature to want to give a gift in return.

    The same holds true in networking circles, when you give something to a networking associate- a business referral, emotional support- she’ll want to give you something in return. Perhaps you won’t get a return gift immediately. However, the more you give your networking partners, the more inclined they will be to reciprocate.

    A true gift is an unconditional gift; you give without expecting anything in return. However, usually you get something back anyway. First, you gain the satisfaction of helping a friend. Second, human nature dictates that you will get something in return. When you least expect it, you may receive a gift worth far more to you than the time and effort you expended.

    The most lasting impression others have of you is the first impression: the way you looked and behaved when they first met you. If that’s a bad impression, it may take a long time to overcome and others may be reluctant to get involved with you. A master networker understands this and puts a lot of effort into creating a good first impression by dressing and behaving appropriately at all times.

    However, your long-term image goes well beyond how you look at first glance. Equal in importance, according to Morgan, are three character attributes: responsibility, reliability, and readiness. The group needs some tasks done or problem handled, do you take responsibility? Can you be counted on to come through when the need arises? Are you quick to volunteer your services?

    Above and beyond the first visual impression you make, your responsibility for, reliability within, and readiness to participate in group activities become the most important aspects of your image in the long run. If the group sees you as an asset by virtue of your character, individuals in the group will trust you, rely on you, and enjoy associating with you. And they will feel more comfortable referring their friends and associates to you— and your business.

    In the end, this trilogy of networking leverage comes down to an old principle, known in some parts of the world as the “Golden Rule”. In BNI we just phrase it a little differently: “Givers Gain.”

    To find a BNI chapter near you, visit BNI.com.

  • Jan 6

    A thoughtful estate plan can make your heirs lives easier. But it is your parents’ estate planning that will make your life easier.

    Not every family has fostered the ability to speak openly in love. But if you have begun that process, here is an outline of what grown children need to know about their parents’ business. In fact, adults of any age should update their estate plan every year.

    And, as a parent, if you are willing to share some of this information with your children—especially if one of them is also the executor of the estate— they’ll appreciate having the facts and be more prepared emotionally when the time comes. They will know your wishes ultimately anyway, and good communication will lessen any surprises ahead of time. They will benefit from knowing the answers to the following questions:

    Do you have enough saved for a comfortable retirement? Many financial planners use a safe withdrawal rate by age to make sure the clients will still have enough money toward the end of their retirement. But, this isn’t always the case, and is worth looking into. If your spending is under this withdrawal rate, you have more than enough and probably can leave a legacy to your heirs. But, if you are over this rate, you may run out of money and have to compromise your standard of living abruptly. It may be uncomfortable, even embarrassing, for parents to share their finances with their children, but grown children often want to know how their parents are doing.

    Where are the important documents? The five documents your children should be able to retrieve quickly are: a will; a living will; a power of attorney; a directory of basic information; and the latest end-of-year financial statements.

    The directory of information should list the assets of your estate, along with the account or policy numbers and contact phone numbers. It also helps to indicate your intentions for the distribution of each asset, which will help confirm you have the correct titling and beneficiary designations on every portion of your estate.

    You may have structured your will to divide your estate equally among your children. But, if you have tried to make it easy for one child to access your bank accounts by adding his or her name, you have overridden your estate plan and left that child joint tenancy with complete rights of survivorship. This can be a problem.

    Titling and beneficiary designations are legal estate planning actions. It’s best to review them with your legal advisor. Various types of assets are best designated differently in the estate plan. This is not the occasion for do-it-yourself thrift. It is a rare family that has compiled and reviewed a complete list of estate assets: bank accounts, investment accounts, retirement accounts, real estate holding, life insurance, health savings accounts, and so on.

    Are there any special bequeaths? Any promises you have made should be documented. Your good intentions won’t matter if you aren’t around to implement them. If you have promised money to a charity, and want that obligation kept, document it. If you have promised to loan a child money, document it. If you have promised to help fund your grandchildren’s college education, document it. Without documentation, none of these promises can be kept if you aren’t around to make the decisions.

    Are there plans to remarry? If parents have remarried, intergenerational estate planning is even more critical. Prenuptial agreements and careful estate planning are required in the case of second marriages, to avoid disinherited children or grandchildren from the first marriage. The default is rarely a good option.

    Do you have any prepaid funeral arrangements? Do you want to be buried or cremated? Do you have any preferences for a memorial service? Although it may seem macabre to plan your own funeral, a memorial service takes time and thought. It will be that much more special and comforting to your family when it is filled with your favorite music and readings. Encourage your children’s interest in your estate planning. Most of the time, their intentions are honorable. They may simply want to understand your values and therefore your wishes.

  • Dec 31

    Last year, in Phenix City, Alabama, tax preparer Lasondra Miles Davis was ordered to pay $1,941 in restitution to the IRS, sentenced to two years in prison, and one year of supervised release for her involvement in a stolen ID tax fraud.

    Davis pleaded guilty to one count of aggravated ID theft. Her mother, Teresa Floyd pleaded guilty earlier in the year to one count of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. and one count of aggravated ID theft.

    News outlets cited court documents that said that between March 2011 and May 2014, Davis and her mother operated several tax preparation businesses where she obtained stolen IDs. Floyd then used the information to file more than 900 false federal income tax returns that claimed more than $2.5 million in refunds.

  • Dec 9

    Shhhh! I have a secret for you. I’m going to share it with you today, but you have to promise to keep it under wraps.

    Applied to your business correctly, this one “secret” could transform your business. If you have the faith to apply this secret correctly, it could be worth millions. Your life could change from struggling to keep the wolves at bay to successful entrepreneur nearly overnight.

    Okay, here’s your tip of the day. Well, it’s not so much a tip of the day, as it is the tip of the week, or maybe the tip of the year…

    Change your prices. That’s all you have to do. I have seen more people make more money simply by raising their prices than any other advice I’ve given them.

    Nearly every business person grossly underestimates the elasticity of price, and neglects the fraction of their customers/clients/patients who will cheerfully buy a higher priced premium option of what they sell if only it were offered. They leave a lot of money on the table by not offering a leather bound version of the paper bound product; a red door to walk through in the back instead of the blue door in the front.

    Marketing guru Dan Kennedy talks of the time he lived in Phoenix. At the time, there was a very popular nightclub in Phoenix that had a big, long rope line in the front where you could buy a card for $500 a year that allowed you to stand in the rope line in the back. Well, you say, who’s gonna buy a card for that? A lot of people did, based on the length of the line in the back. In fact, some nights the rope line in the back was longer than the rope line in the front.

    Not everyone will, but there are plenty of customers who will select a premium option. Price is very elastic. Most business people don’t understand just how elastic price is because of the manner in which they set their prices. Here’s what most people do, and I’d be willing to bet you’ve done the same thing. They look around at what everybody else in their industry is charging and set their price right in the middle. They think they’re being “competitive.” If they’re really daring, they try to be a little higher than the average; or if they think they can buy volume, maybe they set it a little lower than average.

    Alas, there are also those poor souls who attempt to price themselves at the bottom of the heap in order to proclaim they have the lowest prices on the block, in their town, their region, or whatever. It is a dangerous strategy because, as I’ve warned you time and again, there is always someone willing to go out of business faster than you are.

    Here’s the power of transaction size. Granted, it’s a very simple example, but one you might ought to post on your wall where you can see it every day. How do you get to a million dollars in sales in your business? You can get there with one transaction, if you can sell someone something for a million bucks. If you’re going to sell something for $100 it’s going to take you 10,000 sales to make it. Making a million dollar sale is not 10,000 times harder than making a $100 sale. It just isn’t. Now, I’m not saying Starbucks could figure out how to make a million dollar sale, but they did figure out how to sell a cup of coffee for $8. They didn’t do that by getting a committee together in a conference room and saying, “Let’s see, Denny’s sells their coffee for $0.55 and Dunkin Donuts is $0.72, so, let’s be courageous and go for $0.99.” That’s NOT how they got there.

    You’re familiar with Omaha Steaks, right? They come in a Styrofoam ice chest delivered to your door. They have good steaks. But, you know they also have hamburgers. And they have hot dogs. All of them delivered right to your door. So, Omaha steaks are, let’s say, double or triple the price of the best beef being sold in the supermarket or butcher shop. Maybe they’re five times as much as Sam’s or Costco. Yes, they do deliver, but a steak is a steak is a steak. Right?

    Wrong! Now, there’s Allen Brothers. Ever try theirs? I hear they are wonderful. It’s twice the price of Omaha. These guys are in the same business, catalogue selling of steaks, hamburgers, hot dogs, and they have the gall to charge twice as much as Omaha! And people are switching like there’s no tomorrow.

    I recently read about a cosmetic surgeon, Doctor Fairfield, who lives in the Philadelphia area. He does seminars to bring in new patients. At the seminar he offers a $25,000 membership in the practice for the patient to have all the cosmetic procedures they want or need for three years. So you want to come have a Botox shot every day? You can; $25,000 membership fee up front. Five people in a room of 150 chose this option, and three of them had no prior relationship with him. They showed up based on a newspaper ad and plunked down $25,000. That’s price elasticity. It’s everywhere. I promise you, most people don’t understand it and most people underestimate it.

  • Nov 22

    Gwen Jorgensen recently became the first U.S. woman to win Olympic gold in the triathlon, crossing the finish line with a time of 1:56:16.

    Jorgensen earned a master’s degree in accounting at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, passed the CPA, and took a position as a tax accountant with the EY corporate tax group. She didn’t even take up triathlon until after college. In college, Jorgensen was a runner and swimmer, and was approached by USA Triathlon looking for college athletes they thought would be successful in the sport. She initially turned USA Triathlon down, but they convinced her to try the sport as a hobby while working for EY.

    With the help of one of the tax partners at EY, Jorgensen was able to work a flexible schedule to accommodate travel for competitions and time to train for the 2012 Olympics in London. After the London Olympics, she decided to put her accounting career on hold in order to devote her time to training.

    Looks like it was time well spent. It’s not every day a tax accountant from Wisconsin wins a gold medal in the Olympics.

  • Nov 11

    Steve Jobs was the co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Apple, Inc. This is the fifth anniversary of his death. These inspirational words are often referred to as his last.

    I have come to the pinnacle of success in business.

    In the eyes of others, my life has been the symbol of success.

    However, apart from work, I have little joy. Finally, my wealth is simply a fact to which I am accustomed.

    At this time, lying on the hospital bed and remembering all my life, I realize that all the accolades and riches of which I was once so proud, have become insignificant with my imminent death.

    In the dark, when I look at green lights, of the equipment for artificial respiration and feel the buzz of their mechanical sounds, I can feel the breath of my approaching death looming over me.

    Only now, do I understand that once you accumulate enough money for the rest of your life, you have to pursue objectives that are not related to wealth.

    It should be something more important:

    For example, stories of love, art, dreams of my childhood.

    No, stop pursuing wealth, it can only make a person into a twisted being, just like me.

    God has made us one way, we can feel the love in the heart of each of us, and not illusions built by fame or money, like I made in my life, I cannot take them with me.

    I can only take with me the memories that were strengthened by love.

    This is the true wealth that will follow you; will accompany you, he will give strength and light to go ahead.

    Love can travel thousands of miles and so life has no limits. Move to where you want to go. Strive to reach the goals you want to achieve. Everything is in your heart and in your hands.

    What is the world’s most expensive bed? The hospital bed.

    You, if you have money, you can hire someone to drive your car, but you cannot hire someone to take your illness that is killing you.

    Material things lost can be found. But one thing you can never find when you lose: life.

    Whatever stage of life where we are right now, at the end we will have to face the day when the curtain falls.

    Please treasure your family love, love for your spouse, love for your friends…

    Treat everyone well and stay friendly with your neighbors.

  • Oct 28

    In what may come as a shock to many of you, the country is broke and is looking for additional revenues. You should know, it will be looking in every nook and cranny to replenish the federal coffers. What you may not know is the Internal Revenue Service seems already to be engaged in revenue-finding-missions. Among the objects of their affection – in the tax audit – are sole proprietors filing Schedule C, and substantiation requirements for every possible deduction.

    The IRS now views the Schedule C as the repository of all manner of evil taxpayer intentions to reduce their tax liabilities (and, from the perspective of the IRS, federal revenues). IRS agents are reportedly beating the bushes of sole proprietors primarily to reduce, or eliminate, claimed deductions as unsubstantiated to increase both income and self-employment tax liabilities.

    All deductions are a matter of legislative grace, and that grace comes with a price: at a minimum to maintain books and records to support the expenditure, and, in many cases, to meet more exacting substantiation standards than the Code imposes as a condition to deductibility in various circumstances. One might not think of charitable contributions as a source of major contention with the IRS, but in the case of non-cash contributions, the taxpayer is technically required to establish, both the fair market value of the property and the property’s adjusted basis. In some cases, the Code requires an appraisal of property (where the value exceeds $5,000) contributed to a charity.

    However, the property’s adjusted basis comes into question in two cases: first in most cases where the property is inventory in the hands of the donor, and secondly, if tangible personal property that is unrelated to the charity’s exempt function, the amount of the contribution is limited to the donor’s adjusted basis in the property. For example, if a taxpayer donates used clothing to a charity that does not distribute them to poor or indigent individuals, the deduction is limited to the lesser of your basis or fair market value. Now, it may seem like common sense that the current value of almost all used clothing is less than what was paid for it but technically, a claim for a deduction of such items requires some proof of both the fair market value and the cost basis of the property.

    And such was the case I recently read about in Surgent’s Tax Issues Newsletter where a taxpayer was denied a claimed $850 deduction for clothing donated to charity. Yes $850! The return was under audit and the taxpayer submitted photographs of all the clothing donated and matched them up to the current list of retail prices published by The Salvation Army and recognized by the IRS– but that wasn’t enough. The auditor wanted purchase receipts of each item to establish the cost basis. Even if the taxpayer was in the 35 percent tax bracket, the amount of tax at issue was only $298. The IRS correctly assumed the taxpayer would throw in the towel rather than incur additional time, effort and costs to substantiate the deduction. So, the IRS pressed the issue hard enough to deny any deduction. Hooray, the deficit was reduced $300!

    From a practical standpoint, trying to establish the cost of most any item of personal property even shortly after its purchase, much less a couple of years down the road, is extremely difficult. So, nothing prevents the IRS from using similar audit strategies where larger sums of money are involved.

    Echoing the motivation Willie Sutton once famously gave for robbing banks, the Internal Revenue Service knows where the money is.