Richard A. Lindsey, CPA

Lindsey & Waldo, LLC – Certified Public Accountants

  • Apr 27

    In business, doing what others don’t do can often give you an edge. It can position you head and shoulders above your competition. It helps you stand out in a positive way, and when you do, people are attracted to you and your business, and your success grows stronger, deeper, and more durable.

    Asking for feedback is a simple way to gather information for improving our businesses, but many of us never take the time to ask. We get so wrapped up in the day-to-day running of the business that we fail to pause and ask people, “How are we doing?” Others are simply intimidated by the process – and afraid of what they’ll hear.

    According to the book The 29% Solution by Ivan Misner and Michelle R. Donovan there are five main reasons why we don’t ask for feedback: (1) we’re afraid the response will be negative; (2) we don’t know who to ask; (3) we don’t know when to ask; (4) we don’t know how to ask; (5) we don’t want to take up other people’s time. With all these objections, the thought of asking for feedback can give us heartburn, but it’s worth the pain; the potential for growth can be tremendous.

    Whether positive or negative, feedback should be considered constructive, because it helps our business develop new products, improve existing services, and sometimes adopt a whole new approach.

    Fear of a negative response may be what keeps many of us from asking for feedback. Nobody is eager to be criticized. But, as difficult as it to receive, negative feedback is actually a gift. It’s a reality check; it reminds us that no matter how good we are, we can always improve. It’s also a reminder that we can never make everyone happy. If you’re willing to ask for feedback, you’re going to get some negative feedback along the way. It’s your attitude toward it that will turn that negative feedback into an opportunity. Don’t ask for feedback unless you’re ready to hear it – and respond to it constructively.

    Whom should you ask for feedback? One answer is everybody. Ask your coworkers, supervisors, subordinates, partners, customers.

    When is the best time to ask for feedback? That depends. A professional development trainer might ask for feedback several times. During a session, so it can be tailored, the end of a session, and three or four months afterwards. She’ll ask different questions at different times. Someone selling a product might need to give the customer time to use it, or might not. Someone selling professional services might want to ask shortly after the services have been delivered.

    What if you don’t know how to ask for feedback? The easiest, and most logical, way is make it part of your sales process. Many companies use a questionnaire; some hand it out upon completion of the assignment, some e-mail it afterward, and some mail it as a follow-up in a few weeks. How you choose to do it depends on your customer base.

    The last reservation that a lot of us have is that we are reluctant to take someone else’s time by asking for feedback. What a cop-out. Adults have the option of saying no. It’s our responsibility to ask. Increase the likelihood that you’ll get useful feedback by making the request simple and timely. If it’s too complicated, or if you set a hurry-up deadline, your requests may end up in the circular file. Make the deadline too far off, and people will set it aside and forget it.

    I dare you – do something few others do. Stand out from the crowd. Ask for feedback. And be ready to turn it into opportunities for your business.

  • Apr 14

    When was the last time you reviewed your will? People generally make wills to guarantee the proper disposition of their money and property, which is why it’s a good idea to consult your CPA when it’s time to create or update your will.

    We recommend that you revisit your will every time you experience a major life event, such as marriage, the birth of a child, retirement, or other significant milestones. Even if there is no meaningful change in your life, it’s smart to review the document every couple of years to ensure it still addresses all your estate concerns and reflects your wishes. Changes in the value of your investments – such as stock portfolio or real estate – may also require adjustments in your estate plan.

    Reviewing your will may raise questions about various areas of your financial life, including your retirement or estate planning, college savings, or other financial concerns. Be sure to turn to us for the perspective and advice you need to make the best choices.♦

  • Mar 31

    Just prior to Christmas 2015, Congress passed the PATH Act which permanently extended several tax provisions, which had been on a cycle of being temporarily extended for one or two years at a time. (See “Congress Takes a New Tack on Extenders” in the February 2016 issue of “Taxing Times”.) While there were some very important items that were permanently extended by the PATH Act, not everything was. Some provisions which expired at the end of 2016 and may be important to you include:

    • the exclusion from gross income of the discharge of qualified principal residence indebtedness income,
    • the treatment of mortgage insurance premiums as qualified residence interest, which permits a taxpayer whose income is below certain thresholds to deduct the cost of premiums on mortgage insurance purchased in connection with acquisition indebtedness on the taxpayer’s principal residence,
    • the above-the-line deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses, and
    • the 7.5% adjusted-gross-income floor for deducting medical expenses, applicable to individuals age 65 and older and their spouses, which increases to 10% in 2017.

    It is possible Congress will retroactively extend some, or all, of these provisions, but as it currently stands, these provisions have seen the end of the road.♦

  • Mar 17

    Inevitably, the question I get asked when I work with people dealing with severe IRS problems is “Can you keep me out of jail?” It’s one of the big fears about finally facing up to and doing something about the problem.

    Not filing your tax returns IS considered a crime. You CAN go to jail if you have not filed your tax returns OR if you’ve filed them inaccurately. You can receive one year of prison time for each year of unfiled returns and procrastinating just increases the chances of going to jail.

    The IRS doesn’t take kindly to non-filers they have to chase down. And believe me, they will eventually chase you down. Just because it’s been a few years since you’ve filed and nothing has happened, doesn’t mean you’ve slipped through the cracks. People rarely slip through the cracks. Why go through life looking over your shoulder wondering when the other shoe is going to drop, when the IRS is finally going to catch up with you and demand their money? Life’s too short to live that way.

    Even if it’s been years since you filed returns, you can still avoid prison. The more willing you are to face up to your situation and seek a solution, the more likely the IRS is to work with you. The IRS doesn’t seek to put anyone in jail that voluntarily comes forward and files old returns.

    Owing the IRS money IS NOT considered a crime. The IRS cannot send you to jail for owing money, if you’ve accurately filed your tax returns. But, don’t pop the bubbly just yet. Although jail time is arguably the worst thing that can happen, it’s not the only punishment that the IRS can deliver. By not facing your IRS debt and taking action, you could be staring into the ugly eyes of…

    • wage garnishments;
    • seizure of your car, house, or boat;
    • seizure of your bank account;
    • seizure of other real estate;
    • seizure of your Social Security benefits, 401(k)s, and IRAs;
    • seizure of cash loan value of your life insurance; and
    • seizure of commissions owed to you.

    If you have filed your tax returns accurately but can’t afford to pay the taxes owed, there are ways to pay your debt and avoid those nasty consequences listed above. But, it’s a bad idea to go it alone. Walking into an IRS office and trying to work out a deal is a recipe for disaster. It’s too easy for them to get you to say something you’ll regret later. Seek out a qualified professional you can trust.

  • Mar 3

    Current research suggests that we are bombarded with between 300 and 700 marketing messages per day. Current research also indicates that we take note of less than half of those messages, and far fewer make a strong enough impact to be recalled, make an impression, or make a sale.

    Here’s a tried and true strategy for connecting with your customers and prospects. Legendary copywriter, Robert Collier, pioneered and perfected an effective strategy he called “entering the conversation already occurring in the prospect’s mind.” Instead of going straight into your pitch marketing message and being ignored like everyone else, do something different. After all, if you do what everyone else does, shouldn’t you expect the same mediocre results?

    Instead of hitting your prospects over the head with your message, first capture your prospects attention by using something they are already thinking about as the hook. Then, make a smooth transition into the marketing message. This strategy has been proven to work over and over again. There are several ways to implement this strategy. One is by using holidays.

    Holidays are always on people’s minds. For instance, right now people are thinking about what they are going to do for the upcoming holidays. Where are we going for Christmas or Hanukkah? Where’s the New Year’s Eve party? Am I going to make (and keep) any New Year’s resolutions? Where should I take my sweetheart for Valentine’s Day? Where’s the best place to go for some corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day?

    And on and on. Those are just the major holidays in the next four months. There’s a major holiday almost every month. There are also obscure holidays you probably never heard of nearly every day of the year. You did know that December 25th is also National Pumpkin Pie Day, didn’t you? So, why not make a connection with your prospect by “entering the conversation already occurring in the prospect’s mind” by relating your message to the approaching holiday?

    You have to make a reasonable connection between the holiday and your offer. Otherwise, the prospect will feel like you tried to trick them and that’s no way to get them to know, like, and trust you, let alone buy something from you. It’s really not that hard. You can probably come up with several ideas if you just sit down and think about it.

    New Year’s Day is easy. Think about tying your message to something new or to a New Year’s resolution. Health clubs and gyms do it every January. The air waves and ads talk about the most common New Year’s resolution around – losing weight. With the promise that this year — you can do it… you can have that new body, the new you — with our help.

    And, of course, you can have a “sweetheart” deal for Valentine’s Day.

    This is a powerful, tried and true marketing strategy. And the best part is… if it works this year, you can recycle it again next year!

  • Feb 17

    New January 31 Deadline for Employers

    Employers are now required to file their copies of Form W-2, submitted to the Social Security Administration by January 31.

    The new deadline also applies to Forms 1099-MISC reporting non-employee compensation, such as payments to independent contractors.

    In the past, employers typically had until the end of February if filing on paper, or the end of March if filing electronically, to submit copies of these forms.

    The new accelerated deadline will make it easier for the IRS to spot errors and verify the legitimacy of tax returns and properly issue refunds to eligible taxpayers. Penalties for late filing can be exorbitant! For example, if a business fails to file Form 1099-MISC or furnish a copy to the payee on time the penalty can be as high as $520 per occurrence.

    New March 15 Deadline for Partnerships and LLCs

    Partnership tax returns are now due March 15, NOT April 15 as in the past.

    S corporation tax returns due date remains unchanged at March 15.

    New April 15 Deadline for C Corporations

    C corporation tax returns are now due April 15, NOT March 15.

  • Feb 3

    How The Tax Code Makes Regular Taxpayers Angry

    Many people think that preparing taxes for a living is a somewhat easy assignment.

    Bless their hearts.

    It’s NOT just “filling in the boxes” and having the spreadsheets or the software spit out the results. I WISH it were so simple. There are three big reasons why it’s much harder than that — even for many professionals.

    1) The tax code is incredibly long. The version of the tax code we are using right now is more than 75,000 pages long (and that is about 186 times LONGER than it was back in 1913 when we started with it) — and it will likely be getting longer this coming year.

    2) The code also happens to be pretty complicated and laden with contradictory incentives. Take this credit, and watch that other credit go bye-bye. Fail to deduct this item, and then you won’t be able to deduct that other item. You get the picture.

    Sorting through all of them is most definitely NOT a task for a computer software program. It requires sitting down with an individual, a business owner, a family, determining what they most care about, and then use that complicated code to plan for it all properly. Really, that’s the only way to do it. Everything else is just “after the fact” clean-up work.

    Which is why it’s so critical to meet with someone before the end of the year to make sure that you’re set up to hold a tax position which represents the real picture of where you really want to be going.

    This is the essence of tax planning. Some may say that this is overstating it — but, after years of doing this, I’ve become convinced that it’s the truth. I’m in the business of helping you fulfill your dreams by helping you hold on to as much income/revenue as possible!

    3) Oh, and as I alluded to previously, there is one more big reason this job is no cupcake — staying up to date with how the law is constantly changing.

    And I’m as patriotic as the next person … but, Congress makes THIS task no cupcake.

    Despite what certain fringe voices might claim (and they cite all kinds of “facts” behind their claims), the truth is that we don’t have the choice to “not file” or “not pay” what the tax laws say we owe. That’s why the IRS audits returns and has all sorts of “encouragements” (liens, refund offsets) to encourage us to file by each April 15, and to do so correctly.

    But, even with automatic payroll deductions, etc. we U.S. taxpayers are trusted to fill out the forms, ensure the correct amount was withheld and let the IRS know what our true final bill was. That’s called tax filing. And if we discover that we owe the U.S. Treasury, then our system (as it stands now) relies on us to send in the necessary payments. This, of course, is what we spend much of our time on around here at Team Lindsey — helping YOU do this ethically, but ensuring you’re not overpaying.

    But, Congress makes this much harder than they need to.

    They do this — probably unintentionally — by tinkering with our tax laws so much. They change them, sometimes slightly, sometimes quite a bit, and they do so constantly. What’s worse is the annual rite of procrastination in the House and Senate. I see this all the time. As a regular course of business.

    And these delays in tax changes — or the decision to make some laws retroactive months later (extenders, estate tax, etc.) — totally screw up basic tax planning, sometimes negating options that could have been used to legally lower a tax bill.

    (Which, incidentally, is why I have to pay so much attention to what’s happening in the legislation NOW, during the offseason. I do this so you don’t have to.)

    So some people fudge their returns. And, unfortunately, they feel justified in doing so.

    One recent example was the first-time homebuyer credit that was created a few years back … then revised … and revised again. Many homebuyers had to “pay back” a credit that was taken under existing law — then later canceled.

    And I know (from conversations with real people) how many felt justified in finding ways to “skim back” (i.e. fudge) that $500 back into their returns because they were annoyed at how Congress handled it.

    And there are plenty of other tax laws with similar histories that tick off filers enough so that they look for ways of getting payback when they fill out their 1040s.

    Now, I’m not condoning these taxpayers’ decisions to “even up” the tax code where they may find it unfair. Life can be unfair and taxes are a part of that often unfair life.

    But, Congress can do a lot to prevent these “they hurt me, so I’ll hurt the tax system right back” attitudes, by doing its tax-writing job in a more rational and professional manner.

    Until it does, well, then, Capitol Hill is going to keep creating bad attitudes.

    But, here’s where some hope comes in…

    For my clients and contacts, you can rest assured that we are paying attention … and that we will be on top of even these woefully-procrastinating legislators. We’ll do all that is ethically possible to make sure you don’t make moves that you’ll regret after the fact.

    And the best way to help us help YOU, is by giving us a call to talk things through NOW, while we can still make a difference with 2016 returns.

    “You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn’t exist anywhere except in the mind.” – Dale Carnegie

  • Jan 20

    In the book Masters of Networking, Don Morgan asserts that there are three ways to increase the power of your network and improve its ability to help you achieve goals. Fortunately, he says, anyone can create this leverage by understanding three fundamental characteristics of human nature. However, he goes on, only those dedicated to becoming master networkers will commit to mastering the arts of friendship, generosity, and character. The person who creates this trilogy of leverage will be on the road to unlocking the full power of networks.

    Friends like to help friends. And at some point in your life, you’ve probably helped a good friend do something that you might not have enjoyed doing— painting a room, helping out with the move–just because he was your friend. You really couldn’t avoid it. If you make good friends of your networking associates, you gain the same kind of leverage.

    How do you turn networking associates into good friends? There’s nothing complicated or mysterious about it, Morgan says. Think back how you and your best friend became friends. You went places together, did things together, talked about things, and one day you realize that you have been best friends for some time without even realizing it.

    That’s what you do with your networking partners. Go places with them, do things with them, help them when they need help. Soon you’ll discover that associates have become good friends. Not all of them, of course, but the more effort you put into it, the more friends you’ll make. And the more powerful your network will be in helping you achieve goals.

    You’re at a party. You’re given several presents. You don’t have anything to give in return. How do you feel? A little less than wonderful, right? It’s human nature to want to give a gift in return.

    The same holds true in networking circles, when you give something to a networking associate- a business referral, emotional support- she’ll want to give you something in return. Perhaps you won’t get a return gift immediately. However, the more you give your networking partners, the more inclined they will be to reciprocate.

    A true gift is an unconditional gift; you give without expecting anything in return. However, usually you get something back anyway. First, you gain the satisfaction of helping a friend. Second, human nature dictates that you will get something in return. When you least expect it, you may receive a gift worth far more to you than the time and effort you expended.

    The most lasting impression others have of you is the first impression: the way you looked and behaved when they first met you. If that’s a bad impression, it may take a long time to overcome and others may be reluctant to get involved with you. A master networker understands this and puts a lot of effort into creating a good first impression by dressing and behaving appropriately at all times.

    However, your long-term image goes well beyond how you look at first glance. Equal in importance, according to Morgan, are three character attributes: responsibility, reliability, and readiness. The group needs some tasks done or problem handled, do you take responsibility? Can you be counted on to come through when the need arises? Are you quick to volunteer your services?

    Above and beyond the first visual impression you make, your responsibility for, reliability within, and readiness to participate in group activities become the most important aspects of your image in the long run. If the group sees you as an asset by virtue of your character, individuals in the group will trust you, rely on you, and enjoy associating with you. And they will feel more comfortable referring their friends and associates to you— and your business.

    In the end, this trilogy of networking leverage comes down to an old principle, known in some parts of the world as the “Golden Rule”. In BNI we just phrase it a little differently: “Givers Gain.”

    To find a BNI chapter near you, visit BNI.com.

  • Jan 6

    A thoughtful estate plan can make your heirs lives easier. But it is your parents’ estate planning that will make your life easier.

    Not every family has fostered the ability to speak openly in love. But if you have begun that process, here is an outline of what grown children need to know about their parents’ business. In fact, adults of any age should update their estate plan every year.

    And, as a parent, if you are willing to share some of this information with your children—especially if one of them is also the executor of the estate— they’ll appreciate having the facts and be more prepared emotionally when the time comes. They will know your wishes ultimately anyway, and good communication will lessen any surprises ahead of time. They will benefit from knowing the answers to the following questions:

    Do you have enough saved for a comfortable retirement? Many financial planners use a safe withdrawal rate by age to make sure the clients will still have enough money toward the end of their retirement. But, this isn’t always the case, and is worth looking into. If your spending is under this withdrawal rate, you have more than enough and probably can leave a legacy to your heirs. But, if you are over this rate, you may run out of money and have to compromise your standard of living abruptly. It may be uncomfortable, even embarrassing, for parents to share their finances with their children, but grown children often want to know how their parents are doing.

    Where are the important documents? The five documents your children should be able to retrieve quickly are: a will; a living will; a power of attorney; a directory of basic information; and the latest end-of-year financial statements.

    The directory of information should list the assets of your estate, along with the account or policy numbers and contact phone numbers. It also helps to indicate your intentions for the distribution of each asset, which will help confirm you have the correct titling and beneficiary designations on every portion of your estate.

    You may have structured your will to divide your estate equally among your children. But, if you have tried to make it easy for one child to access your bank accounts by adding his or her name, you have overridden your estate plan and left that child joint tenancy with complete rights of survivorship. This can be a problem.

    Titling and beneficiary designations are legal estate planning actions. It’s best to review them with your legal advisor. Various types of assets are best designated differently in the estate plan. This is not the occasion for do-it-yourself thrift. It is a rare family that has compiled and reviewed a complete list of estate assets: bank accounts, investment accounts, retirement accounts, real estate holding, life insurance, health savings accounts, and so on.

    Are there any special bequeaths? Any promises you have made should be documented. Your good intentions won’t matter if you aren’t around to implement them. If you have promised money to a charity, and want that obligation kept, document it. If you have promised to loan a child money, document it. If you have promised to help fund your grandchildren’s college education, document it. Without documentation, none of these promises can be kept if you aren’t around to make the decisions.

    Are there plans to remarry? If parents have remarried, intergenerational estate planning is even more critical. Prenuptial agreements and careful estate planning are required in the case of second marriages, to avoid disinherited children or grandchildren from the first marriage. The default is rarely a good option.

    Do you have any prepaid funeral arrangements? Do you want to be buried or cremated? Do you have any preferences for a memorial service? Although it may seem macabre to plan your own funeral, a memorial service takes time and thought. It will be that much more special and comforting to your family when it is filled with your favorite music and readings. Encourage your children’s interest in your estate planning. Most of the time, their intentions are honorable. They may simply want to understand your values and therefore your wishes.

  • Dec 31

    Last year, in Phenix City, Alabama, tax preparer Lasondra Miles Davis was ordered to pay $1,941 in restitution to the IRS, sentenced to two years in prison, and one year of supervised release for her involvement in a stolen ID tax fraud.

    Davis pleaded guilty to one count of aggravated ID theft. Her mother, Teresa Floyd pleaded guilty earlier in the year to one count of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. and one count of aggravated ID theft.

    News outlets cited court documents that said that between March 2011 and May 2014, Davis and her mother operated several tax preparation businesses where she obtained stolen IDs. Floyd then used the information to file more than 900 false federal income tax returns that claimed more than $2.5 million in refunds.