Richard A. Lindsey, CPA

Lindsey & Waldo, LLC – Certified Public Accountants

  • Jul 21

    Many Americans appear to be living one big expense away from disaster. A 2014 Federal Reserve poll discovered the startling fact that almost half of all U.S. households could not come up with $400 to cover an emergency expense. They would need to sell something, or borrow cash, to do so.

    If you find yourself belonging to that category, then I have some ideas (11 of them, in fact) I think will help. In my experience, if you want to get out of a hole, you study the behavior of those who have already made it out. And you do everything you can to copy that behavior.

    Yes, some people have been fortunate enough to inherit wealth, etc. But many, MANY more of those who have wealth came about it in a different way.

    Now, so that YOU do not find yourself in the unfortunate place of not being able to scrape up $400 in an emergency … read this now.

    Becoming a household that will be able to ride through instability and uncertainty is only going to become MORE important in future years, not less. So, that being the case, here is a portrait of those who are able to achieve this status.

    You’ll notice that these are just as significantly about your mindset as you relate to your finances, as about your behaviors.

    Here’s what the Financially Secure look like …

    1) He always spends less than he earns. In fact, his mantra is that over the long run, you’re better off if you strive to be anonymously rich rather than deceptively poor.

    2) She knows that patience is truth. The odds are you won’t become a millionaire overnight. If you’re like her, your security will be accumulated gradually by diligently saving your money over multiple decades.

    3) He pays off his credit cards in full every month. He’s smart enough to understand that if he can’t afford to pay cash for something, then he can’t afford it.

    4) She realized early on that money does not buy happiness. If you’re looking for financial joy, you need to focus on attaining financial freedom.

    5) He understands that money is like a toddler; it is incapable of managing itself. After all, you can’t expect your money to grow and mature as it should without some form of credible money management.

    6) She’s a big believer in paying yourself first. It’s an essential tenet of personal finance and a great way to build your savings and instill financial discipline.

    7) She also knows that the few millionaires that reached that milestone without a plan got there only because of dumb luck. It’s not enough to simply “declare” to the universe that you want to be financially free. This is not a “Secret”.

    8) When it came time to set his savings goals, he wasn’t afraid to think big. Financial success demands that you have a vision that is significantly larger than you can currently deliver upon.

    9) He realizes that stuff happens, and that’s why you’re a fool if you don’t insure yourself against risk. Remember that the potential for bankruptcy is always just around the corner, and can be triggered from multiple sources: the death of the family’s key breadwinner, divorce, or disability that leads to a loss of work.

    10) She understands that time is an ally of the young. She was fortunate (and smart) enough to begin saving in her twenties, so she could take maximum advantage of the power of compounding interest on her nest egg.

    11) He’s not impressed that you drive an over-priced luxury car and live in a McMansion that’s two sizes too big for your family of four. Little about external “signals” of wealth actually matter to him.

    And a little bonus, if you will: She doesn’t pay taxes which could have been avoided with a simple phone call to her tax professional. She plans ahead, before tax time.

    “You cannot control what happens to you, but you can control your attitude toward what happens to you, and in that, you will be mastering change rather than allowing it to master you.” – Brian Tracy

  • Jul 7

    How to Write Off Katie’s Soccer Camp

    Yes, it is quite do-able. But, like many things in the tax code, the devil is in the details. Let’s see if I can cut through the Tax Mumbo Jumbo for you.

    If Katie (or Bruce) is younger than 13 and goes to a DAY camp (overnight doesn’t work), and you are both working (or “looking for work”) then,…

    Cha-ching.

    You can then choose to pay for the camp using a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) or you can take the child care credit. Remember credits are better than deductions. With both the FSA and the child care credit, other eligible expenses include the cost of day care or preschool, before or after school care, and a nanny or other babysitter while you work.

    The size of the credit depends on your income and the number of children you have who are younger than 13. You can count up to $3,000 in child care expenses for one child, or up to $6,000 for two or more children.

    There are some limitations. The credit is only good for families of a certain income range and the percentage of eligible costs varies with income.

    All told, it’s a good deal which you should take advantage of, if you qualify.

    Bonus… If you have two or more children and child care costs exceed $5,000 for the year, you can benefit from both accounts. You can set aside up to $5,000 in pretax money in your FSA for child care costs, then claim the child care credit for up to $1,000 in additional expenses.

     

    Other strange, but true deductions

    You can pay your significant other (pay attention now) to do legitimate work for you and take a deduction.

    Bruce hired his live-in girlfriend to manage his rental properties. Her duties included finding furniture, overseeing repairs, and running his personal household. He went to Tax Court and fought the IRS which had disallowed the entire deduction. He won a deduction for the portion of his payments which could legitimately be tied to her business work.

    A married couple owned a junk yard and put out cat food to attract wild cats. Why, you might ask? The feral cats they were trying to attract dealt with snakes and rats on the property. That made for a safer junkyard for customers.

    And that made cat food a business deduction. The IRS first thought this was ridiculous, but before the case reached the Tax Court the IRS agreed!

    The details are always important, so be careful and ask us for advice first.

  • Apr 14

    When was the last time you reviewed your will? People generally make wills to guarantee the proper disposition of their money and property, which is why it’s a good idea to consult your CPA when it’s time to create or update your will.

    We recommend that you revisit your will every time you experience a major life event, such as marriage, the birth of a child, retirement, or other significant milestones. Even if there is no meaningful change in your life, it’s smart to review the document every couple of years to ensure it still addresses all your estate concerns and reflects your wishes. Changes in the value of your investments – such as stock portfolio or real estate – may also require adjustments in your estate plan.

    Reviewing your will may raise questions about various areas of your financial life, including your retirement or estate planning, college savings, or other financial concerns. Be sure to turn to us for the perspective and advice you need to make the best choices.♦

  • Jan 6

    A thoughtful estate plan can make your heirs lives easier. But it is your parents’ estate planning that will make your life easier.

    Not every family has fostered the ability to speak openly in love. But if you have begun that process, here is an outline of what grown children need to know about their parents’ business. In fact, adults of any age should update their estate plan every year.

    And, as a parent, if you are willing to share some of this information with your children—especially if one of them is also the executor of the estate— they’ll appreciate having the facts and be more prepared emotionally when the time comes. They will know your wishes ultimately anyway, and good communication will lessen any surprises ahead of time. They will benefit from knowing the answers to the following questions:

    Do you have enough saved for a comfortable retirement? Many financial planners use a safe withdrawal rate by age to make sure the clients will still have enough money toward the end of their retirement. But, this isn’t always the case, and is worth looking into. If your spending is under this withdrawal rate, you have more than enough and probably can leave a legacy to your heirs. But, if you are over this rate, you may run out of money and have to compromise your standard of living abruptly. It may be uncomfortable, even embarrassing, for parents to share their finances with their children, but grown children often want to know how their parents are doing.

    Where are the important documents? The five documents your children should be able to retrieve quickly are: a will; a living will; a power of attorney; a directory of basic information; and the latest end-of-year financial statements.

    The directory of information should list the assets of your estate, along with the account or policy numbers and contact phone numbers. It also helps to indicate your intentions for the distribution of each asset, which will help confirm you have the correct titling and beneficiary designations on every portion of your estate.

    You may have structured your will to divide your estate equally among your children. But, if you have tried to make it easy for one child to access your bank accounts by adding his or her name, you have overridden your estate plan and left that child joint tenancy with complete rights of survivorship. This can be a problem.

    Titling and beneficiary designations are legal estate planning actions. It’s best to review them with your legal advisor. Various types of assets are best designated differently in the estate plan. This is not the occasion for do-it-yourself thrift. It is a rare family that has compiled and reviewed a complete list of estate assets: bank accounts, investment accounts, retirement accounts, real estate holding, life insurance, health savings accounts, and so on.

    Are there any special bequeaths? Any promises you have made should be documented. Your good intentions won’t matter if you aren’t around to implement them. If you have promised money to a charity, and want that obligation kept, document it. If you have promised to loan a child money, document it. If you have promised to help fund your grandchildren’s college education, document it. Without documentation, none of these promises can be kept if you aren’t around to make the decisions.

    Are there plans to remarry? If parents have remarried, intergenerational estate planning is even more critical. Prenuptial agreements and careful estate planning are required in the case of second marriages, to avoid disinherited children or grandchildren from the first marriage. The default is rarely a good option.

    Do you have any prepaid funeral arrangements? Do you want to be buried or cremated? Do you have any preferences for a memorial service? Although it may seem macabre to plan your own funeral, a memorial service takes time and thought. It will be that much more special and comforting to your family when it is filled with your favorite music and readings. Encourage your children’s interest in your estate planning. Most of the time, their intentions are honorable. They may simply want to understand your values and therefore your wishes.

  • Oct 14

    Q. My husband and I sold our home on Fowl River that we purchased in 1973 for $459,000, and reinvested the profits in a smaller condo in town. Will we be required to pay the new 3.8% Medicare surtax (now referred to as the net investment income tax) on the gain? I understand it applies when your income is above $250,000.

    A. The 3.8% net investment income tax applies to the lesser of the net investment income for the year, or the excess of modified adjusted gross income over the $250,000 threshold. However, it does not apply to items, such as the gain on the sale of your personal residence, which do not have to be reported on your tax return.

    Do you have a question for the Taxpert that you’d like to see answered in a future Taxing Times? Or perhaps just an issue you’d like the Taxpert to address? Send the Taxpert a note to Taxing Times, 1050 Hillcrest Rd., Ste A, Mobile, AL 36695 or an email to taxpert@CPAMobileAL.com.

  • Aug 19

    Don’t you just love Congressional tricks?

    One of my personal “favorites” is when they cram a bunch of unrelated business into their bills.

    Which is just what happened about a year ago, and it could affect you…

    H.R. 3236, popularly known as “The Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015” (yes, that’s how these things are named) brought some tax-law-related changes.

    Individual tax returns are still due on April 15th — and a six month extension period is still available. But …

    * Partnership tax returns are due March 15, NOT April 15 as in the past. If your partnership isn’t on a calendar year, the return is due on the 15th day of the third month following the close of your tax year.

    * C corporation tax returns are due April 15, NOT March 15. For non-calendar years, it is due on the 15th day of the fourth month following the close of the tax year.

    * S corporation tax returns remain unchanged–they are still due March 15, or the third month following the close of the taxable year.

    On TOP of that, another doozy: audits can get you for six years now, instead of three. Without going into all of the details, essentially if you withhold reporting of 25% or more of your income, the IRS has six years to figure it out. They’ve always had unlimited time for fraud or criminality … but there was some wiggle room for underreporting in the past. No longer.

    All this (and MORE!) in one measly highway bill.

    So, it pays even more to work with a pro, yes?

    These sort of issues are what we specialize in worrying all about — so you don’t have to. Because YOU have to keep your head in a bigger picture.

    Entrepreneurs know that hard work and a great idea don’t guarantee success. Fortunately, most of them also know that failure isn’t final — almost every successful business owner client of mine has crashed and burned at least once in his/her career.

    One of the best ways to pick yourself, or your business, back up off the ground is to take a fresh look at things that you “thought” were set in stone. Here are some strategies I compiled for you to possibly give your business a fresh lease on life, come fall, or into 2017…

    Re-target your market. In the heat of start-up passion, entrepreneurs frequently try to interest too broad a market: “Everyone will want to buy this!” The result: getting lost in the crowd. The more closely you define your market, the more success you will experience.

    Re-examine your price. Price is obviously supremely important. See how you can lower your overhead or cut production costs. Perhaps there’s a new way to package your products, so that your average transaction value can go up?

    Identify and push your best product. Focus on what works. If your hot product is coffee cups, look for ways to highlight and expand that niche instead of veering into new territory. How about different colors and holders for those cups?

    Make your marketing materials more memorable. Emphasize the benefits — SPECIFICALLY how features of your product or service will improve business or the quality of life for your customer. And scrutinize your advertising. Using big media is not always the answer, especially when you have narrowed your market. Don’t overlook narrowly-targeted marketing efforts or joint promotions.

    Keep promoting! Make sure your message sinks in. Find affordable ways to reach your target market, and use these avenues as often as you can. Try social advertising!

    These ideas are to get you started. There may be longer conversations to be had. If so, that’s what we’re here for.

  • May 12

    “Success is simple. Do what’s right, the right way, at the right time.” – Arnold Glasgow

    Now’s the best time to get rid of unnecessary paperwork, as well as to ensure that you caught everything for your 2015 tax return.

    But before I get to what to do if you find something pertinent to your recently-filed tax return, here’s a guide for how long to keep your records…

    Taxes: Seven years
    Richard’s Reasons Why:
    There are three, actually:
    1) The IRS has three years from your filing date to audit your return if it suspects good-faith errors.
    2) The three-year deadline also applies if you’d like to make some sort of amendment because you discover a mistake in your return and can claim a refund.
    3) The IRS has six years to challenge your return if it thinks you underreported your gross income.
    All this adds up to keeping that info for seven years. Beyond that, there’s no reason — except for posterity.

    IRA contribution records: Permanently
    Richard’s Reason Why:
    You’ll need to be able to prove that you already paid tax on this money when the time comes to withdraw.

    Bank records: Usually just one year
    Richard’s Reason Why:
    Those related to your taxes, business expenses, home improvements and mortgage payments will obviously need to be included for next year’s taxes. But, unless there is some sort of emotional or posterity reason, get rid of everything after one year.
    Brokerage statements: Until you sell
    Richard’s Reason Why:
    To prove whether or not you have a capital gain or loss for tax purposes; after this point, shred it.

    Household bills: From one year to permanently
    Richard’s Reason Why:
    When the canceled check from a paid bill has been returned, you can shred the bill with a clear conscience. However, bills for big purchases — such as jewelry, rugs, appliances, antiques, cars, collectibles, furniture, computers, etc. — should be kept in an insurance file for proof of their value in the event of loss or damage.

    Credit card receipts and statements: 45 days/Seven years
    Richard’s Reasons Why:
    Some families don’t even bother to match up their statements, but if you do so, shred the receipts once you’ve verified everything. There’s no reason to keep everyday receipts – unless they support a deduction — beyond this point. For tax-related purchases, you need only keep the statements (and receipts supporting tax deductions) for seven years — after that, shred it, baby!

    Paycheck stubs: One year
    Richard’s Reason Why:
    This is to verify that when you receive your annual W-2 form from your employer, the information from your stubs match. If so, shred all of the stubs … if not, request a corrected form, known as a W-2c. After that’s been handled — shred.

    House/condominium records: Six years/permanently
    Richard’s Reasons Why:
    You’ll want to keep all records documenting the purchase price and the cost of permanent improvements — such as remodeling, additions and installations, as well as records of expenses incurred in selling and buying the property, such as legal fees and your real estate agent’s commission, for six years after you sell your home.

    Holding on to these records is important because any improvements you make on your house, as well as expenses in selling it, are added to the original purchase price or cost basis. Therefore, you lower your capital gains tax when you sell your house.
    Now, in this cleansing process, sometimes you’ll find a receipt or documentation which really would have changed your prior year tax return. That’s when you might have us file an “Amended Return”. However, this decision should be balanced against the cost of doing so, as well as the expected benefit — often these items can be dealt with the following year.
    But here are some other, common reasons to amend…

    * You neglected to report some income earned.
    * You claimed deductions or credits you should not have claimed.
    * You did not claim deductions or credits you could have claimed.
    * You filed under one filing status, but you should have filed under another.

    If you find something like this, let us help you.

    Regardless, let this be a cleansing process for you, and sleep easy knowing you’ve handled this stuff properly.

    Oh, and make sure you use a good shredder!

  • Apr 15

    The theft of your identity, especially personal information such as your name, Social Security number, address and children’s names, can be traumatic and frustrating. In this online era, it’s important to always be on guard.

    The IRS has teamed up with state revenue departments and the tax industry to make sure you understand the dangers to your personal and financial data. Taxes. Security. Together. Working in partnership with you, we can make a difference.

    Here are seven steps you can make part of your routine to protect your tax and financial information:

    1. Read your credit card and banking statements carefully and often– watch for even the smallest charge that appears suspicious. (Neither your credit card, nor bank– or the IRS—will send you emails asking for sensitive personal and financial information; such as asking you to update your account.)
    2. Review and respond to all notices and correspondence from the Internal Revenue Service. Warning signs of tax-related identity theft can include IRS notices about tax returns you did not file, income you did not receive, or employers you’ve never heard of or where you’ve never worked.
    3. Review each of your three credit reports at least once a year. Visit www.annualcreditreport.com to get your free reports.
    4. Review your annual Social Security income statement for excessive income reported. You can sign up for an electronic account at www.SSA.gov.
    5. Read your health insurance statements; look for claims you never filed or care you never received.
    6. Shred any documents with personal and financial information. Never toss documents with your personally identifiable information, especially your Social Security number, in the trash.
    7. If you receive any routine federal deposit such as Social Security Administration or Department of Veterans Affairs benefits, you probably receive those deposits electronically. You can use the same direct deposit process for your federal and state tax refund. IRS direct deposit is safe and secure and places your tax refund directly into the financial account of your choice.
  • Mar 18

    “When planning for a year, plant corn. When planning for a decade, plant trees. When planning for life, train and educate people.” – Chinese Proverb

    Retirement used to mean not only a complete withdrawal from the workforce, but often a retreat from life. Even the word “retire” has the connotations of shuffling quietly off to bed.

    We call that traditional concept a “cliff retirement” because it is so abrupt. One day you are working full-time, and the next you are playing full-time (or slumped in your chair watching TV feeling unwanted and over the hill).

    We all need meaning and significance in our lives. And close social relations are an intrinsic part of our humanness. For many people, work provides meaning, significance and social relationships.

    Try this retirement planning exercise. Draw a large circle and write the names of 10 people inside the circle to whom you are genuinely close. Don’t include any relatives. To a certain extent, they have to love us, and although our connections with our families can be very nurturing, it is often friends who really help to validate us and widen our horizons.

    Now cross out any of the 10 names you know through your work, which might eliminate half or more of the people you listed. Thus a cliff retirement can devastate not only your meaning and purpose, but your social network as well. Retirees who no longer work at all say their close friends dwindle to an average of about nine people.

    As a result of their isolation, people who opt for a cliff retirement often deteriorate quickly and die relatively young. Financial planning is easy when you die young, but we don’t recommend it.

    Here are some suggestions to consider as you approach what is traditionally considered retirement age.

    Consider postponing retirement. Delaying retirement until age 70 increases your Social Security benefits and also shortens the time you will be withdrawing from your portfolio. It gives you additional years to save and your portfolio more time to grow. By delaying retirement from age 65 to 70, you may have more than a 50% higher standard of living when you do stop working.

    Or instead of taking a cliff retirement, think about retiring gradually. Move from full-time to 30 hours a week, and then to half-time. With this less hasty transition you can maintain contact with the people and purposes that give your life meaning, and also have the time to develop goals and a network of relationships for your later years.
    Envision your final years not as retirement, but as financial independence. Now that you don’t need to work exclusively for money, make a list of activities where you would like to focus your energies and use your skills and experience.

    Consider developing a health and fitness routine. If work kept your mind and body engaged, you will need to replace that activity with other pursuits. Again, going part-time allows you the luxury of processing the transition and adjusting to a new lifestyle.

    Challenge and reexamine those stereotyped and overly rigid assumptions about retirement. A book on the subject I highly recommend is Retire Inspired by Chris Hogan. One of Chris’ impactful messages is that retirement is not an age, it’s a number. “It’s an amount you need to live the life in retirement that you’ve always dreamed of.” The book is a $24.99 value, but, because I’m on Dave Ramsey’s tax and accounting team, I was able to purchase a few copies at a huge discount. For the first 15 people who ask, I’ll give you a copy. Not an eBook, but a genuine, off the presses hardback copy. Call the office, send me an email or just drop by, but when they’re gone, they’re gone.

     

    Of course crunching the financial numbers is critical as you begin to contemplate retirement, or any kind of financial or tax planning. But your personal calling, support network, and health and well-being are just as important. In the end, a holistic approach to your life is always the best starting place.

  • Feb 19

    Like Bama’s win over Clemson – you expected it to happen, but they waited until the last minute to make it happen – Congress has once again extended the “extenders”- a varied assortment of more than 50 individual and business tax deductions, tax credits, and other tax saving laws which have been on the books for years, but which technically are temporary because they have a specific end date. This package of tax breaks has repeatedly been temporarily extended for short periods of time (e.g., one or two years), which is why they are referred to as “extenders.”

    Most of the tax breaks expired at the end of 2014. Now, in legislation passed just before the Congressional Christmas break, the extenders have been revived and extended once again, but this time Congress has taken a new tack. Instead of just rolling the package of provisions over for a year or two, it actually made some of the provisions permanent and extended the remaining provisions for either two or five years, while making significant modifications to several of the provisions.

    Key tax breaks for individuals that were made permanent by the new law include:

    • Tax credits for low to middle income earners that were originally enacted as part of the 2009 stimulus package and were slated to expire at the end of 2017: (1) the American Opportunity Tax Credit, which provides up to $2,500 in partially refundable tax credits for post secondary education, (2) eased rules for qualifying for the refundable child credit, and (3) various earned income tax credit (EITC) changes;
    • the $250 above-the-line deduction for teachers and other school professionals for expenses paid or incurred for books, certain supplies, equipment, and supplementary material used by the educator in the classroom; also modified, beginning in 2016, to index the $250 to inflation and include professional development expenses;
    • parity for the exclusions for employer-provided mass transit and parking benefits;
    • the option to take an itemized deduction for state and local general sales taxes instead of the itemized deduction permitted for state and local income taxes;
    • increased contribution limits and carry forward period for contributions of appreciated real property (including partial interests in real property) for conservation purposes; the new law also extends the enhanced deduction for certain farmers and ranchers; and,
    • the provision that permits tax-free distributions to charity from an individual retirement account (IRA) of up to $100,000 per taxpayer per tax year, by taxpayers age 70 ½ or older.

    Key tax breaks for individuals that were extended by the new law include:

    • the exclusion of up to $2 million ($1 million if married filing separately) of discharged principal residence indebtedness from gross income; extended through 2016; the new law also modifies the exclusion to apply to qualified principal residence indebtedness that is discharged in 2017, if the discharge is pursuant to a binding written agreement entered into in 2016;
    • the credit for energy-efficient improvements to principal residence extended through 2016;
    • the deduction for mortgage insurance premiums deductible as qualified residence interest; extended through 2016; and
    • the $4,000 above the line deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses; extended through 2016.

    Key tax breaks affecting businesses that were extended by the new law include:

    • The Work Opportunity Tax Credit was extended through 2019; the new law also modifies the credit beginning in 2016 to apply to employers who hire qualified long-term unemployed individuals (i.e., those who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or more) and increases the credit with respect to such long-term unemployed individuals to 50% of the first $6,000 of wages;
    • 15 year straight-line cost recovery for qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant buildings and improvements, and qualified retail improvements were made permanent;
    • 50% bonus depreciation was extended for property placed in service during 2015 through 2019; the 50% rate is phased down to 40% for property placed in service during 2018 and 30% for property placed in service during 2019;
    • previously increased first-year depreciation cap on trucks and vans not weighing over 6,000 lbs. has been extended through 2017; the increased first year depreciation is lowered for 2018 and 2019 and disappears in 2020; and
    • increase in Section 179 elective business expensing (up to $500,000 annual write-off of eligible business property costs that is phased out as those cost exceed $2 million for the year) is made permanent; also made permanent is the allowance of expensing for computer software and qualified real property.

    Caution: This article contains a general overview of selected tax provisions contained in the PATH Act and does not address all tax provisions contained in the Act. Tax law is constantly changing due to new legislation, cases, regulations, and IRS rulings. Please contact us if you’re interested in a tax topic that is not discussed in this article.